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Report says Africa needs USD60-billion to adapt to climate change

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To address food insecurity in the continent while also limiting the impacts of global warming, it is necessary to immediately implement actions across food systems, including scaling nature-positive production, shifting to healthier and more sustainable diets and radically cutting food loss and waste. Image credit: Leon Louw for WhyAfrica

Reports says Africa needs USD60-billion to adapt to climate change  

Scaling and Accelerating Adaption in Food Systems in Africa, a new report from WWF, estimates that there is a shortfall of about USD60-billion in current climate finance channelled to adaptation in Africa.    

The report states that donors and investors need to assess their portfolios and ensure sufficient funding is allocated for adaptation projects in food systems to support African governments’ plans to build adaptive capacities of their food systems.

An increase in climate finance for adaptation in food systems and redirection of agri-food subsidies to support nature-positive production will help limit the impacts of global warming and tackle food insecurity, but also deliver benefits in water security, sanitation and gender equality.

One in five people in Africa suffers from hunger. Throughout the continent, climate change is reducing crop yields, shortening growing seasons and increasing water stress.

A large amount of the world’s remaining unused arable land is in Africa, but simply expanding food production could further destabilise climate, reducing carbon sequestration in soil, forests, and grasslands, and decreasing biodiversity.

We need food-based climate action (Reports says Africa needs USD60-billion to adapt to climate change)  

The WWF report finds that to address food insecurity in the continent while also limiting the impacts of global warming, it is necessary to immediately implement actions across food systems, including scaling nature-positive production, shifting to healthier and more sustainable diets and radically cutting food loss and waste.

“Climate change is having devastating impacts on food security in Africa and we can expect things to get worse if we don’t urgently implement food-based climate action.

Climate finance must be allocated to the continent and channelled to the local communities who will implement food systems solutions,” says Nancy Rapando, Africa’s Food Future Initiative Lead, WWF.

“At the same time, adaptation plans must be broadened to include shifts to healthier and more sustainable diets and radical cuts in food loss and waste alongside improved food production. Only by adopting full food systems approaches from farm to fork, and setting more ambitious targets, can we achieve food security and a stable climate,” says Rapando.

Clearly articulated Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) enable governments, climate finance and funding agencies, and international partners to expedite subsidy redesign and allocated funds for implementation.

Nature-positive food production is integrated in the majority of African and all NAPs, with a focus on interconnected land-management techniques, including agroforestry and climate-smart agriculture.

However, these plans rarely include policy measures and targets for addressing food loss and waste or the role of shift to sustainable and healthy diets.

Overlooking these critical mitigation and adaptation measures limits the likelihood of unlocking the funding necessary for a food-secure, net-zero emissions future.

COP27 provides countries with an opportunity to enhance their climate plans, and for public and private financial institutions to accelerate allocation and distribution of climate finance and subsidies for food systems transformation.

Reports says Africa needs USD60-billion to adapt to climate change  

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Reports says Africa needs USD60-billion to adapt to climate change  

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